Transcript
  • 00:00    |    
    Initial credits
  • 00:06    |    
    Introduction
  • 01:46    |    
    Occupy Wall Street protests
  • 02:08    |    
    Index of Economic Freedom 2007
  • 03:40    |    
    World income and population for the last 2,000 years
  • 05:24    |    
    Opposition to liberty
  • 06:37    |    
    Dog-eat-dog argument
    • Competition issues
    • Opportunities in capitalism
    • Individual loss
    • Time implications
    • Collective arguments
    • Failure possibilities
    • Gains through failure
    • Free market dynamism
    • Blacksmith's analogy
    • Value creation
    • Emotional implications
    • Abstract ideas
    • Comparative economics
    • Socialist metaphor
    • Moral virtues
  • 36:11    |    
    Destructive competition
    • System predators
    • Comparison between predation and competition
    • Win-lose relationship
  • 43:11    |    
    Responsive strategies to the argument
    • Economics
    • Ethics
    • Politics and the rule of law
    • History
    • Middle East case
  • 47:31    |    
    Final words
  • 47:45    |    
    Final credits


On the Best Arguments Against Free Market Capitalism (Part I)

New Media  | 05 de noviembre de 2011  | Vistas: 82

Liberty has always encountered barriers through time, regardless of the benefits it portrays to those societies that embrace it. Stephen Hicks compiles arguments against free market capitalism that have prevailed in the human mind, and explains the various aspects that support this opposition. In this first part he speaks, among other arguments, about the dog-eat-dog conception regarding the liberal economic and social systems; he also describes the different aspects in which it can be disqualified as a valid argument, due to the misconceptions and fallacies it bears with it.




Conferencista

Stephen Hicks is professor of philosophy and executive director of the…

IDEAS DE LA LIBERTAD

Nuestra misión es la enseñanza y difusión de los principios éticos, jurídicos y económicos de una sociedad de personas libres y responsables.

Universidad Francisco Marroquín